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PROJECT DESCRIPTION

THUMBNAILS

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EDINBURGH CASTLE RESTAURANT

The restaurant forms part of the Scheduled Ancient Monument, which has up to one million visitors a year. It is used as a restaurant by day and for functions at least three nights a week throughout the year. Our scheme addressed shortfalls in appearance, layout and circulation. Through the introduction of full height glazed openings in the positions of original doors, the activity within was revealed to visitors walking around the castle.

Dugal Campbell originally designed Mills Mount Restaurant at Edinburgh Castle as cart sheds in 1746. It was subsequently used as army barracks before its current use. The building was extended with the addition of the Jacobite Room in 1992. It is owned by Historic Scotland.

Kitchen facilities have been rationalised and pulled away from the main façade. The five gable ends have been opened up with 2.7 metre high clear glass doors in each. Internally the front café / bar section and servery area of the restaurant have been paved in limestone with the dining areas finished with an oak floor. The servery elements are made in stainless steel and black granite. Suspended tensile fabric canopies reduce the volume over the seating area. New furniture, finishes and doors compliment the modern expression of the intervention. A dramatic lighting scheme ensures that the restaurant appears bright in the day and animated by night.

Location
Edinburgh (UK)

Date
1999

Project team
Jamie Troughton and Hugh Broughton Architects
Environmental Services Design (services)
Spiers and Major (lighting)
Ralph Ogg and Partners (cost consultants)

Main gallery image: Exteriorview-181.jpg Gallery thumbnail: Exteriorview-181.jpg

EDINBURGH CASTLE RESTAURANT

The restaurant forms part of the Scheduled Ancient Monument, which has up to one million visitors a year. It is used as a restaurant by day and for functions at least three nights a week throughout the year. Our scheme addressed shortfalls in appearance, layout and circulation. Through the introduction of full height glazed openings in the positions of original doors, the activity within was revealed to visitors walking around the castle.

Dugal Campbell originally designed Mills Mount Restaurant at Edinburgh Castle as cart sheds in 1746. It was subsequently used as army barracks before its current use. The building was extended with the addition of the Jacobite Room in 1992. It is owned by Historic Scotland.

Kitchen facilities have been rationalised and pulled away from the main façade. The five gable ends have been opened up with 2.7 metre high clear glass doors in each. Internally the front café / bar section and servery area of the restaurant have been paved in limestone with the dining areas finished with an oak floor. The servery elements are made in stainless steel and black granite. Suspended tensile fabric canopies reduce the volume over the seating area. New furniture, finishes and doors compliment the modern expression of the intervention. A dramatic lighting scheme ensures that the restaurant appears bright in the day and animated by night.

Location
Edinburgh (UK)

Date
1999

Project team
Jamie Troughton and Hugh Broughton Architects
Environmental Services Design (services)
Spiers and Major (lighting)
Ralph Ogg and Partners (cost consultants)

Main gallery image: Interiorview-777.jpg Gallery thumbnail: Interiorview-777.jpg

EDINBURGH CASTLE RESTAURANT

The restaurant forms part of the Scheduled Ancient Monument, which has up to one million visitors a year. It is used as a restaurant by day and for functions at least three nights a week throughout the year. Our scheme addressed shortfalls in appearance, layout and circulation. Through the introduction of full height glazed openings in the positions of original doors, the activity within was revealed to visitors walking around the castle.

Dugal Campbell originally designed Mills Mount Restaurant at Edinburgh Castle as cart sheds in 1746. It was subsequently used as army barracks before its current use. The building was extended with the addition of the Jacobite Room in 1992. It is owned by Historic Scotland.

Kitchen facilities have been rationalised and pulled away from the main façade. The five gable ends have been opened up with 2.7 metre high clear glass doors in each. Internally the front café / bar section and servery area of the restaurant have been paved in limestone with the dining areas finished with an oak floor. The servery elements are made in stainless steel and black granite. Suspended tensile fabric canopies reduce the volume over the seating area. New furniture, finishes and doors compliment the modern expression of the intervention. A dramatic lighting scheme ensures that the restaurant appears bright in the day and animated by night.

Location
Edinburgh (UK)

Date
1999

Project team
Jamie Troughton and Hugh Broughton Architects
Environmental Services Design (services)
Spiers and Major (lighting)
Ralph Ogg and Partners (cost consultants)

Main gallery image: JacobiteRoomHR-E6971093.jpg Gallery thumbnail: JacobiteRoomHR-E6971093.jpg