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PROJECT DESCRIPTION

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INDIAN ANTARCTIC RESEARCH STATION

Following the worldwide attention given to our designs for the British base at Halley, we were invited to prepare designs for the new all-year Indian Research Station in the Larsemann Hills, Antarctica. The site for the new station is an exposed headland subjected to high winds. The modular concept we developed provides facilities where world class science can be conducted in a practical, flexible and comfortable manner.

The modules are designed as highly insulated, fibre reinforced plastic monocoque rings without need for a separate metal structure. Modules can be prefabricated or split into 2.6m wide rings which are within the payload capacity of a typical cargo carrying helicopter. Modules are joined together using insulated silicone rubber bellows and elevated 1.8m above the snow to minimise snow management. A special linking module has been developed to allow up to 4 modules to be joined together, reducing internal circulation. Each module will be supported on four adjustable steel legs connected to the FRP monocoque at a specially strengthened connection point. Fixed to the bottom of each of the legs will be an adjustable base plate incorporating mechanical screw jacks to allow levelling of the modules during construction and subsequent minor adjustments.

The services strategy is founded on modularity, reliability and robustness in use. The over-riding aim is to reduce the amount of fuel and spares which need to be delivered thus reducing, shipping, handling, storage, use, waste removal/disposal and associated costs. Dedicated energy modules contain generators, fuel storage, water treatment, sewage treatment and fire suppression systems.

Sustainability guides the design and the elimination of the use of fossil fuels will be the ultimate goal, although it is anticipated that more conventional systems will be installed to ensure effective operation from day one. Combined Heat & Power (CHP) units will provide the electrical power and heating to the base, supplemented by wind generated energy. With a super insulated and air tight module the amount of hot water off the CHP plant will provide sufficient heat for snow/ice melting for water production in winter.

Location
Larsemann Hills (Antarctica)

Date
2006 - 2007

Project team
Hugh Broughton Architects
AECOM (multi disciplinary engineers)
7-t (CGI visuals)

Main gallery image: IndianAntarcticResearchStation-900.jpg Gallery thumbnail: IndianAntarcticResearchStation-900.jpg

INDIAN ANTARCTIC RESEARCH STATION

Following the worldwide attention given to our designs for the British base at Halley, we were invited to prepare designs for the new all-year Indian Research Station in the Larsemann Hills, Antarctica. The site for the new station is an exposed headland subjected to high winds. The modular concept we developed provides facilities where world class science can be conducted in a practical, flexible and comfortable manner.

The modules are designed as highly insulated, fibre reinforced plastic monocoque rings without need for a separate metal structure. Modules can be prefabricated or split into 2.6m wide rings which are within the payload capacity of a typical cargo carrying helicopter. Modules are joined together using insulated silicone rubber bellows and elevated 1.8m above the snow to minimise snow management. A special linking module has been developed to allow up to 4 modules to be joined together, reducing internal circulation. Each module will be supported on four adjustable steel legs connected to the FRP monocoque at a specially strengthened connection point. Fixed to the bottom of each of the legs will be an adjustable base plate incorporating mechanical screw jacks to allow levelling of the modules during construction and subsequent minor adjustments.

The services strategy is founded on modularity, reliability and robustness in use. The over-riding aim is to reduce the amount of fuel and spares which need to be delivered thus reducing, shipping, handling, storage, use, waste removal/disposal and associated costs. Dedicated energy modules contain generators, fuel storage, water treatment, sewage treatment and fire suppression systems.

Sustainability guides the design and the elimination of the use of fossil fuels will be the ultimate goal, although it is anticipated that more conventional systems will be installed to ensure effective operation from day one. Combined Heat & Power (CHP) units will provide the electrical power and heating to the base, supplemented by wind generated energy. With a super insulated and air tight module the amount of hot water off the CHP plant will provide sufficient heat for snow/ice melting for water production in winter.

Location
Larsemann Hills (Antarctica)

Date
2006 - 2007

Project team
Hugh Broughton Architects
AECOM (multi disciplinary engineers)
7-t (CGI visuals)

Main gallery image: Typicalmodule-601.jpg Gallery thumbnail: Typicalmodule-601.jpg

INDIAN ANTARCTIC RESEARCH STATION

Following the worldwide attention given to our designs for the British base at Halley, we were invited to prepare designs for the new all-year Indian Research Station in the Larsemann Hills, Antarctica. The site for the new station is an exposed headland subjected to high winds. The modular concept we developed provides facilities where world class science can be conducted in a practical, flexible and comfortable manner.

The modules are designed as highly insulated, fibre reinforced plastic monocoque rings without need for a separate metal structure. Modules can be prefabricated or split into 2.6m wide rings which are within the payload capacity of a typical cargo carrying helicopter. Modules are joined together using insulated silicone rubber bellows and elevated 1.8m above the snow to minimise snow management. A special linking module has been developed to allow up to 4 modules to be joined together, reducing internal circulation. Each module will be supported on four adjustable steel legs connected to the FRP monocoque at a specially strengthened connection point. Fixed to the bottom of each of the legs will be an adjustable base plate incorporating mechanical screw jacks to allow levelling of the modules during construction and subsequent minor adjustments.

The services strategy is founded on modularity, reliability and robustness in use. The over-riding aim is to reduce the amount of fuel and spares which need to be delivered thus reducing, shipping, handling, storage, use, waste removal/disposal and associated costs. Dedicated energy modules contain generators, fuel storage, water treatment, sewage treatment and fire suppression systems.

Sustainability guides the design and the elimination of the use of fossil fuels will be the ultimate goal, although it is anticipated that more conventional systems will be installed to ensure effective operation from day one. Combined Heat & Power (CHP) units will provide the electrical power and heating to the base, supplemented by wind generated energy. With a super insulated and air tight module the amount of hot water off the CHP plant will provide sufficient heat for snow/ice melting for water production in winter.

Location
Larsemann Hills (Antarctica)

Date
2006 - 2007

Project team
Hugh Broughton Architects
AECOM (multi disciplinary engineers)
7-t (CGI visuals)

Main gallery image: Energymodule-27.jpg Gallery thumbnail: Energymodule-27.jpg

INDIAN ANTARCTIC RESEARCH STATION

Following the worldwide attention given to our designs for the British base at Halley, we were invited to prepare designs for the new all-year Indian Research Station in the Larsemann Hills, Antarctica. The site for the new station is an exposed headland subjected to high winds. The modular concept we developed provides facilities where world class science can be conducted in a practical, flexible and comfortable manner.

The modules are designed as highly insulated, fibre reinforced plastic monocoque rings without need for a separate metal structure. Modules can be prefabricated or split into 2.6m wide rings which are within the payload capacity of a typical cargo carrying helicopter. Modules are joined together using insulated silicone rubber bellows and elevated 1.8m above the snow to minimise snow management. A special linking module has been developed to allow up to 4 modules to be joined together, reducing internal circulation. Each module will be supported on four adjustable steel legs connected to the FRP monocoque at a specially strengthened connection point. Fixed to the bottom of each of the legs will be an adjustable base plate incorporating mechanical screw jacks to allow levelling of the modules during construction and subsequent minor adjustments.

The services strategy is founded on modularity, reliability and robustness in use. The over-riding aim is to reduce the amount of fuel and spares which need to be delivered thus reducing, shipping, handling, storage, use, waste removal/disposal and associated costs. Dedicated energy modules contain generators, fuel storage, water treatment, sewage treatment and fire suppression systems.

Sustainability guides the design and the elimination of the use of fossil fuels will be the ultimate goal, although it is anticipated that more conventional systems will be installed to ensure effective operation from day one. Combined Heat & Power (CHP) units will provide the electrical power and heating to the base, supplemented by wind generated energy. With a super insulated and air tight module the amount of hot water off the CHP plant will provide sufficient heat for snow/ice melting for water production in winter.

Location
Larsemann Hills (Antarctica)

Date
2006 - 2007

Project team
Hugh Broughton Architects
AECOM (multi disciplinary engineers)
7-t (CGI visuals)

Main gallery image: Linkingcore-533.jpg Gallery thumbnail: Linkingcore-533.jpg