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HALLEY VI ANTARCTIC RESEARCH STATION

Our international competition winning design for the self-sufficient scientific research base is now operational on a floating ice shelf 900 miles from South Pole. Hydraulically elevated ski based modules respond to annually rising snow levels and the need to relocate the base if the site calves off as an iceberg. A special central module provides a dramatic open plan social area at the heart of the station. The project demonstrates our ability to create world-class sustainable design to awesome technical criteria.

Halley is the most southerly research station operated by the British Antarctic Survey and is located 10,000 miles from the UK on the 150-metre thick floating Brunt Ice Shelf, which moves 400 metres per annum towards the sea. Snow levels rise by over 1 metre every year and the sun does not rise above the horizon for 105 days during winter. Temperatures drop to -56C and the site can be buffeted by winds in excess of 100 mph. Access by ship and plane is limited to a 3-months window. Materials and components required to construct the new base have to be delivered across fragile sea ice, which can fracture at any time.

International design competition
Whilst the current base, Halley V, continues to operate effectively, a significant calving of the ice shelf is predicted within the next decade, which would see it floating out to sea as a giant iceberg. As a result, in 2004, a 3-stages international competition was launched for the design of a new, fully relocatable base for 16 people in the winter and 52 in the summer. The competition attracted 86 entries from around the world. In July 2005 Hugh Broughton Architects, working with AECOM, were selected as winners.

Concept = modular
The design has been developed in response to the demands of the science, the comfort of the residents, buildability and the operations inherent in the life of a research station. To meet these demands it is crucial to create a design, which maximises flexibility. This is achieved with a modular approach. Modules can be used for a wide variety of activities ranging from laboratories and bedrooms to recreation areas and energy centres. Connected together, the modules form the new station. Modularity brings significant benefits in terms of flexibility, ease of construction, maintenance, relocation, fire safety, acoustics and robustness. The station is centred on two modular platforms. The northern platform provides the principal habitat. The southern platform contains science modules.

Central module = heart of Halley VI
Whilst the majority of activities that take place at Halley can be provided for using the standard blue module, there are some activities, which are constant, and require a distinct approach. These activities are housed in a special red central module. This is the principal space for eating, drinking and recreation and is the major destination at the new base.

Sustainability at the core
Halley VI is the most environmentally friendly facility that BAS has built. Low on environmental impact during construction, with an extremely efficient, environmentally aware performance life cycle, it can be easily moved and eventually taken apart when the time comes. Halley VI will be a visitor to Antarctica, not a resident. The buildings rest entirely on the surface of the ice shelf. This mobility and flexibility means that the new station will survive and perform on the ice for far longer than any of its distinguished predecessors. The design provides flexibility for the station to be adapted, rearranged and relocated.

Designed for self-preservation
To avoid the fate of previous abandoned stations, the modules are supported on giant steel skis and hydraulically driven legs. The hydraulic legs allow the station to mechanically “climb” up out of the snow every year to avoid being buried. And as the ice shelf moves out towards the ocean, the modules can be lowered onto the skis and towed by bulldozers to a new safer location further inland. The new Halley VI can therefore continue to respond to the changing needs of Antarctic science for many more years than its projected design life.

An icon to world class science
Linked together, the ski based jackable modules create a dramatic new station, which propels Antarctic design into the 21st Century. 100 years after Scott and Shackleton built their timber huts on this frozen continent, Halley VI provides the first ever relocatable modular research station, introducing the very best accommodation for both living and working. The station is packed with stimulating areas for recreation, relaxation and allows total flexibility for growth and change. It sets a new benchmark in design for extreme environments, it is a beacon for sustainable living and an icon to draw attention to some of the most significant and influential science conducted on our planet today.

“The new Halley Research Station is a triumph of British design, innovation and engineering. The UK’s world-class polar science community now has a unique, cutting edge suite of laboratories on the ice. The legacy of Captain Scott, together with our strong track record of scientific discovery in Antarctica, is set to continue in this excellent new facility.”
David Willetts,
Minister for Universities and Science

Location
Brunt Ice Shelf, Antarctica

Dates
2005 – 2012

Project team
Hugh Broughton Architects
AECOM (multi disciplinary engineers)
Billings Design (cladding specialist)
Galliford Try (main contractor)
7-t (CGI visuals)

Awards
Chicago Athenaeum International Architecture Award 2014
International Design Awards First Prize: Institutional 2014
ICE 'Designed in London' Award 2014
Architizer Art and Science Award 2014
Architizer Award 2014 (Higher Education / Research)
ENR Best Global Project 2014
ENR Best Global Education / Research Project 2014
Civic Trust Awards Special Award for Sustainability 2014
Civic Trust Award 2014
Structural Awards Award for Sustainability 2013
BCI Awards International Project of the Year 2013
RIBA International Award for Architecture 2013
AIA UK Excellence in Design Winner - Best Scientific Building

Main gallery image: Conceptviewcopy-EBD699C2.jpg Gallery thumbnail: Conceptviewcopy-EBD699C2.jpg

HALLEY VI ANTARCTIC RESEARCH STATION

Our international competition winning design for the self-sufficient scientific research base is now operational on a floating ice shelf 900 miles from South Pole. Hydraulically elevated ski based modules respond to annually rising snow levels and the need to relocate the base if the site calves off as an iceberg. A special central module provides a dramatic open plan social area at the heart of the station. The project demonstrates our ability to create world-class sustainable design to awesome technical criteria.

Halley is the most southerly research station operated by the British Antarctic Survey and is located 10,000 miles from the UK on the 150-metre thick floating Brunt Ice Shelf, which moves 400 metres per annum towards the sea. Snow levels rise by over 1 metre every year and the sun does not rise above the horizon for 105 days during winter. Temperatures drop to -56C and the site can be buffeted by winds in excess of 100 mph. Access by ship and plane is limited to a 3-months window. Materials and components required to construct the new base have to be delivered across fragile sea ice, which can fracture at any time.

International design competition
Whilst the current base, Halley V, continues to operate effectively, a significant calving of the ice shelf is predicted within the next decade, which would see it floating out to sea as a giant iceberg. As a result, in 2004, a 3-stages international competition was launched for the design of a new, fully relocatable base for 16 people in the winter and 52 in the summer. The competition attracted 86 entries from around the world. In July 2005 Hugh Broughton Architects, working with AECOM, were selected as winners.

Concept = modular
The design has been developed in response to the demands of the science, the comfort of the residents, buildability and the operations inherent in the life of a research station. To meet these demands it is crucial to create a design, which maximises flexibility. This is achieved with a modular approach. Modules can be used for a wide variety of activities ranging from laboratories and bedrooms to recreation areas and energy centres. Connected together, the modules form the new station. Modularity brings significant benefits in terms of flexibility, ease of construction, maintenance, relocation, fire safety, acoustics and robustness. The station is centred on two modular platforms. The northern platform provides the principal habitat. The southern platform contains science modules.

Central module = heart of Halley VI
Whilst the majority of activities that take place at Halley can be provided for using the standard blue module, there are some activities, which are constant, and require a distinct approach. These activities are housed in a special red central module. This is the principal space for eating, drinking and recreation and is the major destination at the new base.

Sustainability at the core
Halley VI is the most environmentally friendly facility that BAS has built. Low on environmental impact during construction, with an extremely efficient, environmentally aware performance life cycle, it can be easily moved and eventually taken apart when the time comes. Halley VI will be a visitor to Antarctica, not a resident. The buildings rest entirely on the surface of the ice shelf. This mobility and flexibility means that the new station will survive and perform on the ice for far longer than any of its distinguished predecessors. The design provides flexibility for the station to be adapted, rearranged and relocated.

Designed for self-preservation
To avoid the fate of previous abandoned stations, the modules are supported on giant steel skis and hydraulically driven legs. The hydraulic legs allow the station to mechanically “climb” up out of the snow every year to avoid being buried. And as the ice shelf moves out towards the ocean, the modules can be lowered onto the skis and towed by bulldozers to a new safer location further inland. The new Halley VI can therefore continue to respond to the changing needs of Antarctic science for many more years than its projected design life.

An icon to world class science
Linked together, the ski based jackable modules create a dramatic new station, which propels Antarctic design into the 21st Century. 100 years after Scott and Shackleton built their timber huts on this frozen continent, Halley VI provides the first ever relocatable modular research station, introducing the very best accommodation for both living and working. The station is packed with stimulating areas for recreation, relaxation and allows total flexibility for growth and change. It sets a new benchmark in design for extreme environments, it is a beacon for sustainable living and an icon to draw attention to some of the most significant and influential science conducted on our planet today.

“The new Halley Research Station is a triumph of British design, innovation and engineering. The UK’s world-class polar science community now has a unique, cutting edge suite of laboratories on the ice. The legacy of Captain Scott, together with our strong track record of scientific discovery in Antarctica, is set to continue in this excellent new facility.”
David Willetts,
Minister for Universities and Science

Location
Brunt Ice Shelf, Antarctica

Dates
2005 – 2012

Project team
Hugh Broughton Architects
AECOM (multi disciplinary engineers)
Billings Design (cladding specialist)
Galliford Try (main contractor)
7-t (CGI visuals)

Awards
Chicago Athenaeum International Architecture Award 2014
International Design Awards First Prize: Institutional 2014
ICE 'Designed in London' Award 2014
Architizer Art and Science Award 2014
Architizer Award 2014 (Higher Education / Research)
ENR Best Global Project 2014
ENR Best Global Education / Research Project 2014
Civic Trust Awards Special Award for Sustainability 2014
Civic Trust Award 2014
Structural Awards Award for Sustainability 2013
BCI Awards International Project of the Year 2013
RIBA International Award for Architecture 2013
AIA UK Excellence in Design Winner - Best Scientific Building

Main gallery image: Centralmoduleisometricviewrecrop-719.jpg Gallery thumbnail: Centralmoduleisometricviewrecrop-719.jpg

HALLEY VI ANTARCTIC RESEARCH STATION

Our international competition winning design for the self-sufficient scientific research base is now operational on a floating ice shelf 900 miles from South Pole. Hydraulically elevated ski based modules respond to annually rising snow levels and the need to relocate the base if the site calves off as an iceberg. A special central module provides a dramatic open plan social area at the heart of the station. The project demonstrates our ability to create world-class sustainable design to awesome technical criteria.

Halley is the most southerly research station operated by the British Antarctic Survey and is located 10,000 miles from the UK on the 150-metre thick floating Brunt Ice Shelf, which moves 400 metres per annum towards the sea. Snow levels rise by over 1 metre every year and the sun does not rise above the horizon for 105 days during winter. Temperatures drop to -56C and the site can be buffeted by winds in excess of 100 mph. Access by ship and plane is limited to a 3-months window. Materials and components required to construct the new base have to be delivered across fragile sea ice, which can fracture at any time.

International design competition
Whilst the current base, Halley V, continues to operate effectively, a significant calving of the ice shelf is predicted within the next decade, which would see it floating out to sea as a giant iceberg. As a result, in 2004, a 3-stages international competition was launched for the design of a new, fully relocatable base for 16 people in the winter and 52 in the summer. The competition attracted 86 entries from around the world. In July 2005 Hugh Broughton Architects, working with AECOM, were selected as winners.

Concept = modular
The design has been developed in response to the demands of the science, the comfort of the residents, buildability and the operations inherent in the life of a research station. To meet these demands it is crucial to create a design, which maximises flexibility. This is achieved with a modular approach. Modules can be used for a wide variety of activities ranging from laboratories and bedrooms to recreation areas and energy centres. Connected together, the modules form the new station. Modularity brings significant benefits in terms of flexibility, ease of construction, maintenance, relocation, fire safety, acoustics and robustness. The station is centred on two modular platforms. The northern platform provides the principal habitat. The southern platform contains science modules.

Central module = heart of Halley VI
Whilst the majority of activities that take place at Halley can be provided for using the standard blue module, there are some activities, which are constant, and require a distinct approach. These activities are housed in a special red central module. This is the principal space for eating, drinking and recreation and is the major destination at the new base.

Sustainability at the core
Halley VI is the most environmentally friendly facility that BAS has built. Low on environmental impact during construction, with an extremely efficient, environmentally aware performance life cycle, it can be easily moved and eventually taken apart when the time comes. Halley VI will be a visitor to Antarctica, not a resident. The buildings rest entirely on the surface of the ice shelf. This mobility and flexibility means that the new station will survive and perform on the ice for far longer than any of its distinguished predecessors. The design provides flexibility for the station to be adapted, rearranged and relocated.

Designed for self-preservation
To avoid the fate of previous abandoned stations, the modules are supported on giant steel skis and hydraulically driven legs. The hydraulic legs allow the station to mechanically “climb” up out of the snow every year to avoid being buried. And as the ice shelf moves out towards the ocean, the modules can be lowered onto the skis and towed by bulldozers to a new safer location further inland. The new Halley VI can therefore continue to respond to the changing needs of Antarctic science for many more years than its projected design life.

An icon to world class science
Linked together, the ski based jackable modules create a dramatic new station, which propels Antarctic design into the 21st Century. 100 years after Scott and Shackleton built their timber huts on this frozen continent, Halley VI provides the first ever relocatable modular research station, introducing the very best accommodation for both living and working. The station is packed with stimulating areas for recreation, relaxation and allows total flexibility for growth and change. It sets a new benchmark in design for extreme environments, it is a beacon for sustainable living and an icon to draw attention to some of the most significant and influential science conducted on our planet today.

“The new Halley Research Station is a triumph of British design, innovation and engineering. The UK’s world-class polar science community now has a unique, cutting edge suite of laboratories on the ice. The legacy of Captain Scott, together with our strong track record of scientific discovery in Antarctica, is set to continue in this excellent new facility.”
David Willetts,
Minister for Universities and Science

Location
Brunt Ice Shelf, Antarctica

Dates
2005 – 2012

Project team
Hugh Broughton Architects
AECOM (multi disciplinary engineers)
Billings Design (cladding specialist)
Galliford Try (main contractor)
7-t (CGI visuals)

Awards
Chicago Athenaeum International Architecture Award 2014
International Design Awards First Prize: Institutional 2014
ICE 'Designed in London' Award 2014
Architizer Art and Science Award 2014
Architizer Award 2014 (Higher Education / Research)
ENR Best Global Project 2014
ENR Best Global Education / Research Project 2014
Civic Trust Awards Special Award for Sustainability 2014
Civic Trust Award 2014
Structural Awards Award for Sustainability 2013
BCI Awards International Project of the Year 2013
RIBA International Award for Architecture 2013
AIA UK Excellence in Design Winner - Best Scientific Building

Main gallery image: Constructionphase-664.jpg Gallery thumbnail: Constructionphase-664.jpg

HALLEY VI ANTARCTIC RESEARCH STATION

Our international competition winning design for the self-sufficient scientific research base is now operational on a floating ice shelf 900 miles from South Pole. Hydraulically elevated ski based modules respond to annually rising snow levels and the need to relocate the base if the site calves off as an iceberg. A special central module provides a dramatic open plan social area at the heart of the station. The project demonstrates our ability to create world-class sustainable design to awesome technical criteria.

Halley is the most southerly research station operated by the British Antarctic Survey and is located 10,000 miles from the UK on the 150-metre thick floating Brunt Ice Shelf, which moves 400 metres per annum towards the sea. Snow levels rise by over 1 metre every year and the sun does not rise above the horizon for 105 days during winter. Temperatures drop to -56C and the site can be buffeted by winds in excess of 100 mph. Access by ship and plane is limited to a 3-months window. Materials and components required to construct the new base have to be delivered across fragile sea ice, which can fracture at any time.

International design competition
Whilst the current base, Halley V, continues to operate effectively, a significant calving of the ice shelf is predicted within the next decade, which would see it floating out to sea as a giant iceberg. As a result, in 2004, a 3-stages international competition was launched for the design of a new, fully relocatable base for 16 people in the winter and 52 in the summer. The competition attracted 86 entries from around the world. In July 2005 Hugh Broughton Architects, working with AECOM, were selected as winners.

Concept = modular
The design has been developed in response to the demands of the science, the comfort of the residents, buildability and the operations inherent in the life of a research station. To meet these demands it is crucial to create a design, which maximises flexibility. This is achieved with a modular approach. Modules can be used for a wide variety of activities ranging from laboratories and bedrooms to recreation areas and energy centres. Connected together, the modules form the new station. Modularity brings significant benefits in terms of flexibility, ease of construction, maintenance, relocation, fire safety, acoustics and robustness. The station is centred on two modular platforms. The northern platform provides the principal habitat. The southern platform contains science modules.

Central module = heart of Halley VI
Whilst the majority of activities that take place at Halley can be provided for using the standard blue module, there are some activities, which are constant, and require a distinct approach. These activities are housed in a special red central module. This is the principal space for eating, drinking and recreation and is the major destination at the new base.

Sustainability at the core
Halley VI is the most environmentally friendly facility that BAS has built. Low on environmental impact during construction, with an extremely efficient, environmentally aware performance life cycle, it can be easily moved and eventually taken apart when the time comes. Halley VI will be a visitor to Antarctica, not a resident. The buildings rest entirely on the surface of the ice shelf. This mobility and flexibility means that the new station will survive and perform on the ice for far longer than any of its distinguished predecessors. The design provides flexibility for the station to be adapted, rearranged and relocated.

Designed for self-preservation
To avoid the fate of previous abandoned stations, the modules are supported on giant steel skis and hydraulically driven legs. The hydraulic legs allow the station to mechanically “climb” up out of the snow every year to avoid being buried. And as the ice shelf moves out towards the ocean, the modules can be lowered onto the skis and towed by bulldozers to a new safer location further inland. The new Halley VI can therefore continue to respond to the changing needs of Antarctic science for many more years than its projected design life.

An icon to world class science
Linked together, the ski based jackable modules create a dramatic new station, which propels Antarctic design into the 21st Century. 100 years after Scott and Shackleton built their timber huts on this frozen continent, Halley VI provides the first ever relocatable modular research station, introducing the very best accommodation for both living and working. The station is packed with stimulating areas for recreation, relaxation and allows total flexibility for growth and change. It sets a new benchmark in design for extreme environments, it is a beacon for sustainable living and an icon to draw attention to some of the most significant and influential science conducted on our planet today.

“The new Halley Research Station is a triumph of British design, innovation and engineering. The UK’s world-class polar science community now has a unique, cutting edge suite of laboratories on the ice. The legacy of Captain Scott, together with our strong track record of scientific discovery in Antarctica, is set to continue in this excellent new facility.”
David Willetts,
Minister for Universities and Science

Location
Brunt Ice Shelf, Antarctica

Dates
2005 – 2012

Project team
Hugh Broughton Architects
AECOM (multi disciplinary engineers)
Billings Design (cladding specialist)
Galliford Try (main contractor)
7-t (CGI visuals)

Awards
Chicago Athenaeum International Architecture Award 2014
International Design Awards First Prize: Institutional 2014
ICE 'Designed in London' Award 2014
Architizer Art and Science Award 2014
Architizer Award 2014 (Higher Education / Research)
ENR Best Global Project 2014
ENR Best Global Education / Research Project 2014
Civic Trust Awards Special Award for Sustainability 2014
Civic Trust Award 2014
Structural Awards Award for Sustainability 2013
BCI Awards International Project of the Year 2013
RIBA International Award for Architecture 2013
AIA UK Excellence in Design Winner - Best Scientific Building

Main gallery image: ©JamesMorris_HalleyVIsideeleva-45814966.jpg Gallery thumbnail: ©JamesMorris_HalleyVIsideeleva-45814966.jpg

HALLEY VI ANTARCTIC RESEARCH STATION

Our international competition winning design for the self-sufficient scientific research base is now operational on a floating ice shelf 900 miles from South Pole. Hydraulically elevated ski based modules respond to annually rising snow levels and the need to relocate the base if the site calves off as an iceberg. A special central module provides a dramatic open plan social area at the heart of the station. The project demonstrates our ability to create world-class sustainable design to awesome technical criteria.

Halley is the most southerly research station operated by the British Antarctic Survey and is located 10,000 miles from the UK on the 150-metre thick floating Brunt Ice Shelf, which moves 400 metres per annum towards the sea. Snow levels rise by over 1 metre every year and the sun does not rise above the horizon for 105 days during winter. Temperatures drop to -56C and the site can be buffeted by winds in excess of 100 mph. Access by ship and plane is limited to a 3-months window. Materials and components required to construct the new base have to be delivered across fragile sea ice, which can fracture at any time.

International design competition
Whilst the current base, Halley V, continues to operate effectively, a significant calving of the ice shelf is predicted within the next decade, which would see it floating out to sea as a giant iceberg. As a result, in 2004, a 3-stages international competition was launched for the design of a new, fully relocatable base for 16 people in the winter and 52 in the summer. The competition attracted 86 entries from around the world. In July 2005 Hugh Broughton Architects, working with AECOM, were selected as winners.

Concept = modular
The design has been developed in response to the demands of the science, the comfort of the residents, buildability and the operations inherent in the life of a research station. To meet these demands it is crucial to create a design, which maximises flexibility. This is achieved with a modular approach. Modules can be used for a wide variety of activities ranging from laboratories and bedrooms to recreation areas and energy centres. Connected together, the modules form the new station. Modularity brings significant benefits in terms of flexibility, ease of construction, maintenance, relocation, fire safety, acoustics and robustness. The station is centred on two modular platforms. The northern platform provides the principal habitat. The southern platform contains science modules.

Central module = heart of Halley VI
Whilst the majority of activities that take place at Halley can be provided for using the standard blue module, there are some activities, which are constant, and require a distinct approach. These activities are housed in a special red central module. This is the principal space for eating, drinking and recreation and is the major destination at the new base.

Sustainability at the core
Halley VI is the most environmentally friendly facility that BAS has built. Low on environmental impact during construction, with an extremely efficient, environmentally aware performance life cycle, it can be easily moved and eventually taken apart when the time comes. Halley VI will be a visitor to Antarctica, not a resident. The buildings rest entirely on the surface of the ice shelf. This mobility and flexibility means that the new station will survive and perform on the ice for far longer than any of its distinguished predecessors. The design provides flexibility for the station to be adapted, rearranged and relocated.

Designed for self-preservation
To avoid the fate of previous abandoned stations, the modules are supported on giant steel skis and hydraulically driven legs. The hydraulic legs allow the station to mechanically “climb” up out of the snow every year to avoid being buried. And as the ice shelf moves out towards the ocean, the modules can be lowered onto the skis and towed by bulldozers to a new safer location further inland. The new Halley VI can therefore continue to respond to the changing needs of Antarctic science for many more years than its projected design life.

An icon to world class science
Linked together, the ski based jackable modules create a dramatic new station, which propels Antarctic design into the 21st Century. 100 years after Scott and Shackleton built their timber huts on this frozen continent, Halley VI provides the first ever relocatable modular research station, introducing the very best accommodation for both living and working. The station is packed with stimulating areas for recreation, relaxation and allows total flexibility for growth and change. It sets a new benchmark in design for extreme environments, it is a beacon for sustainable living and an icon to draw attention to some of the most significant and influential science conducted on our planet today.

“The new Halley Research Station is a triumph of British design, innovation and engineering. The UK’s world-class polar science community now has a unique, cutting edge suite of laboratories on the ice. The legacy of Captain Scott, together with our strong track record of scientific discovery in Antarctica, is set to continue in this excellent new facility.”
David Willetts,
Minister for Universities and Science

Location
Brunt Ice Shelf, Antarctica

Dates
2005 – 2012

Project team
Hugh Broughton Architects
AECOM (multi disciplinary engineers)
Billings Design (cladding specialist)
Galliford Try (main contractor)
7-t (CGI visuals)

Awards
Chicago Athenaeum International Architecture Award 2014
International Design Awards First Prize: Institutional 2014
ICE 'Designed in London' Award 2014
Architizer Art and Science Award 2014
Architizer Award 2014 (Higher Education / Research)
ENR Best Global Project 2014
ENR Best Global Education / Research Project 2014
Civic Trust Awards Special Award for Sustainability 2014
Civic Trust Award 2014
Structural Awards Award for Sustainability 2013
BCI Awards International Project of the Year 2013
RIBA International Award for Architecture 2013
AIA UK Excellence in Design Winner - Best Scientific Building

Main gallery image: ©JamesMorris_HalleyVIcentralmo-3AADB495.jpg Gallery thumbnail: ©JamesMorris_HalleyVIcentralmo-3AADB495.jpg

HALLEY VI ANTARCTIC RESEARCH STATION

Our international competition winning design for the self-sufficient scientific research base is now operational on a floating ice shelf 900 miles from South Pole. Hydraulically elevated ski based modules respond to annually rising snow levels and the need to relocate the base if the site calves off as an iceberg. A special central module provides a dramatic open plan social area at the heart of the station. The project demonstrates our ability to create world-class sustainable design to awesome technical criteria.

Halley is the most southerly research station operated by the British Antarctic Survey and is located 10,000 miles from the UK on the 150-metre thick floating Brunt Ice Shelf, which moves 400 metres per annum towards the sea. Snow levels rise by over 1 metre every year and the sun does not rise above the horizon for 105 days during winter. Temperatures drop to -56C and the site can be buffeted by winds in excess of 100 mph. Access by ship and plane is limited to a 3-months window. Materials and components required to construct the new base have to be delivered across fragile sea ice, which can fracture at any time.

International design competition
Whilst the current base, Halley V, continues to operate effectively, a significant calving of the ice shelf is predicted within the next decade, which would see it floating out to sea as a giant iceberg. As a result, in 2004, a 3-stages international competition was launched for the design of a new, fully relocatable base for 16 people in the winter and 52 in the summer. The competition attracted 86 entries from around the world. In July 2005 Hugh Broughton Architects, working with AECOM, were selected as winners.

Concept = modular
The design has been developed in response to the demands of the science, the comfort of the residents, buildability and the operations inherent in the life of a research station. To meet these demands it is crucial to create a design, which maximises flexibility. This is achieved with a modular approach. Modules can be used for a wide variety of activities ranging from laboratories and bedrooms to recreation areas and energy centres. Connected together, the modules form the new station. Modularity brings significant benefits in terms of flexibility, ease of construction, maintenance, relocation, fire safety, acoustics and robustness. The station is centred on two modular platforms. The northern platform provides the principal habitat. The southern platform contains science modules.

Central module = heart of Halley VI
Whilst the majority of activities that take place at Halley can be provided for using the standard blue module, there are some activities, which are constant, and require a distinct approach. These activities are housed in a special red central module. This is the principal space for eating, drinking and recreation and is the major destination at the new base.

Sustainability at the core
Halley VI is the most environmentally friendly facility that BAS has built. Low on environmental impact during construction, with an extremely efficient, environmentally aware performance life cycle, it can be easily moved and eventually taken apart when the time comes. Halley VI will be a visitor to Antarctica, not a resident. The buildings rest entirely on the surface of the ice shelf. This mobility and flexibility means that the new station will survive and perform on the ice for far longer than any of its distinguished predecessors. The design provides flexibility for the station to be adapted, rearranged and relocated.

Designed for self-preservation
To avoid the fate of previous abandoned stations, the modules are supported on giant steel skis and hydraulically driven legs. The hydraulic legs allow the station to mechanically “climb” up out of the snow every year to avoid being buried. And as the ice shelf moves out towards the ocean, the modules can be lowered onto the skis and towed by bulldozers to a new safer location further inland. The new Halley VI can therefore continue to respond to the changing needs of Antarctic science for many more years than its projected design life.

An icon to world class science
Linked together, the ski based jackable modules create a dramatic new station, which propels Antarctic design into the 21st Century. 100 years after Scott and Shackleton built their timber huts on this frozen continent, Halley VI provides the first ever relocatable modular research station, introducing the very best accommodation for both living and working. The station is packed with stimulating areas for recreation, relaxation and allows total flexibility for growth and change. It sets a new benchmark in design for extreme environments, it is a beacon for sustainable living and an icon to draw attention to some of the most significant and influential science conducted on our planet today.

“The new Halley Research Station is a triumph of British design, innovation and engineering. The UK’s world-class polar science community now has a unique, cutting edge suite of laboratories on the ice. The legacy of Captain Scott, together with our strong track record of scientific discovery in Antarctica, is set to continue in this excellent new facility.”
David Willetts,
Minister for Universities and Science

Location
Brunt Ice Shelf, Antarctica

Dates
2005 – 2012

Project team
Hugh Broughton Architects
AECOM (multi disciplinary engineers)
Billings Design (cladding specialist)
Galliford Try (main contractor)
7-t (CGI visuals)

Awards
Chicago Athenaeum International Architecture Award 2014
International Design Awards First Prize: Institutional 2014
ICE 'Designed in London' Award 2014
Architizer Art and Science Award 2014
Architizer Award 2014 (Higher Education / Research)
ENR Best Global Project 2014
ENR Best Global Education / Research Project 2014
Civic Trust Awards Special Award for Sustainability 2014
Civic Trust Award 2014
Structural Awards Award for Sustainability 2013
BCI Awards International Project of the Year 2013
RIBA International Award for Architecture 2013
AIA UK Excellence in Design Winner - Best Scientific Building

Main gallery image: ©AntDubber_Day_HalleyVI_winter-39C34960.jpg Gallery thumbnail: ©AntDubber_Day_HalleyVI_winter-39C34960.jpg

HALLEY VI ANTARCTIC RESEARCH STATION

Our international competition winning design for the self-sufficient scientific research base is now operational on a floating ice shelf 900 miles from South Pole. Hydraulically elevated ski based modules respond to annually rising snow levels and the need to relocate the base if the site calves off as an iceberg. A special central module provides a dramatic open plan social area at the heart of the station. The project demonstrates our ability to create world-class sustainable design to awesome technical criteria.

Halley is the most southerly research station operated by the British Antarctic Survey and is located 10,000 miles from the UK on the 150-metre thick floating Brunt Ice Shelf, which moves 400 metres per annum towards the sea. Snow levels rise by over 1 metre every year and the sun does not rise above the horizon for 105 days during winter. Temperatures drop to -56C and the site can be buffeted by winds in excess of 100 mph. Access by ship and plane is limited to a 3-months window. Materials and components required to construct the new base have to be delivered across fragile sea ice, which can fracture at any time.

International design competition
Whilst the current base, Halley V, continues to operate effectively, a significant calving of the ice shelf is predicted within the next decade, which would see it floating out to sea as a giant iceberg. As a result, in 2004, a 3-stages international competition was launched for the design of a new, fully relocatable base for 16 people in the winter and 52 in the summer. The competition attracted 86 entries from around the world. In July 2005 Hugh Broughton Architects, working with AECOM, were selected as winners.

Concept = modular
The design has been developed in response to the demands of the science, the comfort of the residents, buildability and the operations inherent in the life of a research station. To meet these demands it is crucial to create a design, which maximises flexibility. This is achieved with a modular approach. Modules can be used for a wide variety of activities ranging from laboratories and bedrooms to recreation areas and energy centres. Connected together, the modules form the new station. Modularity brings significant benefits in terms of flexibility, ease of construction, maintenance, relocation, fire safety, acoustics and robustness. The station is centred on two modular platforms. The northern platform provides the principal habitat. The southern platform contains science modules.

Central module = heart of Halley VI
Whilst the majority of activities that take place at Halley can be provided for using the standard blue module, there are some activities, which are constant, and require a distinct approach. These activities are housed in a special red central module. This is the principal space for eating, drinking and recreation and is the major destination at the new base.

Sustainability at the core
Halley VI is the most environmentally friendly facility that BAS has built. Low on environmental impact during construction, with an extremely efficient, environmentally aware performance life cycle, it can be easily moved and eventually taken apart when the time comes. Halley VI will be a visitor to Antarctica, not a resident. The buildings rest entirely on the surface of the ice shelf. This mobility and flexibility means that the new station will survive and perform on the ice for far longer than any of its distinguished predecessors. The design provides flexibility for the station to be adapted, rearranged and relocated.

Designed for self-preservation
To avoid the fate of previous abandoned stations, the modules are supported on giant steel skis and hydraulically driven legs. The hydraulic legs allow the station to mechanically “climb” up out of the snow every year to avoid being buried. And as the ice shelf moves out towards the ocean, the modules can be lowered onto the skis and towed by bulldozers to a new safer location further inland. The new Halley VI can therefore continue to respond to the changing needs of Antarctic science for many more years than its projected design life.

An icon to world class science
Linked together, the ski based jackable modules create a dramatic new station, which propels Antarctic design into the 21st Century. 100 years after Scott and Shackleton built their timber huts on this frozen continent, Halley VI provides the first ever relocatable modular research station, introducing the very best accommodation for both living and working. The station is packed with stimulating areas for recreation, relaxation and allows total flexibility for growth and change. It sets a new benchmark in design for extreme environments, it is a beacon for sustainable living and an icon to draw attention to some of the most significant and influential science conducted on our planet today.

“The new Halley Research Station is a triumph of British design, innovation and engineering. The UK’s world-class polar science community now has a unique, cutting edge suite of laboratories on the ice. The legacy of Captain Scott, together with our strong track record of scientific discovery in Antarctica, is set to continue in this excellent new facility.”
David Willetts,
Minister for Universities and Science

Location
Brunt Ice Shelf, Antarctica

Dates
2005 – 2012

Project team
Hugh Broughton Architects
AECOM (multi disciplinary engineers)
Billings Design (cladding specialist)
Galliford Try (main contractor)
7-t (CGI visuals)

Awards
Chicago Athenaeum International Architecture Award 2014
International Design Awards First Prize: Institutional 2014
ICE 'Designed in London' Award 2014
Architizer Art and Science Award 2014
Architizer Award 2014 (Higher Education / Research)
ENR Best Global Project 2014
ENR Best Global Education / Research Project 2014
Civic Trust Awards Special Award for Sustainability 2014
Civic Trust Award 2014
Structural Awards Award for Sustainability 2013
BCI Awards International Project of the Year 2013
RIBA International Award for Architecture 2013
AIA UK Excellence in Design Winner - Best Scientific Building

Main gallery image: ©JamesMorris_Interiorcentralmod-D6F68618.jpg Gallery thumbnail: ©JamesMorris_Interiorcentralmod-D6F68618.jpg

HALLEY VI ANTARCTIC RESEARCH STATION

Our international competition winning design for the self-sufficient scientific research base is now operational on a floating ice shelf 900 miles from South Pole. Hydraulically elevated ski based modules respond to annually rising snow levels and the need to relocate the base if the site calves off as an iceberg. A special central module provides a dramatic open plan social area at the heart of the station. The project demonstrates our ability to create world-class sustainable design to awesome technical criteria.

Halley is the most southerly research station operated by the British Antarctic Survey and is located 10,000 miles from the UK on the 150-metre thick floating Brunt Ice Shelf, which moves 400 metres per annum towards the sea. Snow levels rise by over 1 metre every year and the sun does not rise above the horizon for 105 days during winter. Temperatures drop to -56C and the site can be buffeted by winds in excess of 100 mph. Access by ship and plane is limited to a 3-months window. Materials and components required to construct the new base have to be delivered across fragile sea ice, which can fracture at any time.

International design competition
Whilst the current base, Halley V, continues to operate effectively, a significant calving of the ice shelf is predicted within the next decade, which would see it floating out to sea as a giant iceberg. As a result, in 2004, a 3-stages international competition was launched for the design of a new, fully relocatable base for 16 people in the winter and 52 in the summer. The competition attracted 86 entries from around the world. In July 2005 Hugh Broughton Architects, working with AECOM, were selected as winners.

Concept = modular
The design has been developed in response to the demands of the science, the comfort of the residents, buildability and the operations inherent in the life of a research station. To meet these demands it is crucial to create a design, which maximises flexibility. This is achieved with a modular approach. Modules can be used for a wide variety of activities ranging from laboratories and bedrooms to recreation areas and energy centres. Connected together, the modules form the new station. Modularity brings significant benefits in terms of flexibility, ease of construction, maintenance, relocation, fire safety, acoustics and robustness. The station is centred on two modular platforms. The northern platform provides the principal habitat. The southern platform contains science modules.

Central module = heart of Halley VI
Whilst the majority of activities that take place at Halley can be provided for using the standard blue module, there are some activities, which are constant, and require a distinct approach. These activities are housed in a special red central module. This is the principal space for eating, drinking and recreation and is the major destination at the new base.

Sustainability at the core
Halley VI is the most environmentally friendly facility that BAS has built. Low on environmental impact during construction, with an extremely efficient, environmentally aware performance life cycle, it can be easily moved and eventually taken apart when the time comes. Halley VI will be a visitor to Antarctica, not a resident. The buildings rest entirely on the surface of the ice shelf. This mobility and flexibility means that the new station will survive and perform on the ice for far longer than any of its distinguished predecessors. The design provides flexibility for the station to be adapted, rearranged and relocated.

Designed for self-preservation
To avoid the fate of previous abandoned stations, the modules are supported on giant steel skis and hydraulically driven legs. The hydraulic legs allow the station to mechanically “climb” up out of the snow every year to avoid being buried. And as the ice shelf moves out towards the ocean, the modules can be lowered onto the skis and towed by bulldozers to a new safer location further inland. The new Halley VI can therefore continue to respond to the changing needs of Antarctic science for many more years than its projected design life.

An icon to world class science
Linked together, the ski based jackable modules create a dramatic new station, which propels Antarctic design into the 21st Century. 100 years after Scott and Shackleton built their timber huts on this frozen continent, Halley VI provides the first ever relocatable modular research station, introducing the very best accommodation for both living and working. The station is packed with stimulating areas for recreation, relaxation and allows total flexibility for growth and change. It sets a new benchmark in design for extreme environments, it is a beacon for sustainable living and an icon to draw attention to some of the most significant and influential science conducted on our planet today.

“The new Halley Research Station is a triumph of British design, innovation and engineering. The UK’s world-class polar science community now has a unique, cutting edge suite of laboratories on the ice. The legacy of Captain Scott, together with our strong track record of scientific discovery in Antarctica, is set to continue in this excellent new facility.”
David Willetts,
Minister for Universities and Science

Location
Brunt Ice Shelf, Antarctica

Dates
2005 – 2012

Project team
Hugh Broughton Architects
AECOM (multi disciplinary engineers)
Billings Design (cladding specialist)
Galliford Try (main contractor)
7-t (CGI visuals)

Awards
Chicago Athenaeum International Architecture Award 2014
International Design Awards First Prize: Institutional 2014
ICE 'Designed in London' Award 2014
Architizer Art and Science Award 2014
Architizer Award 2014 (Higher Education / Research)
ENR Best Global Project 2014
ENR Best Global Education / Research Project 2014
Civic Trust Awards Special Award for Sustainability 2014
Civic Trust Award 2014
Structural Awards Award for Sustainability 2013
BCI Awards International Project of the Year 2013
RIBA International Award for Architecture 2013
AIA UK Excellence in Design Winner - Best Scientific Building

Main gallery image: ©JamesMorris_Observationdeck-84565826.jpg Gallery thumbnail: ©JamesMorris_Observationdeck-84565826.jpg

HALLEY VI ANTARCTIC RESEARCH STATION

Our international competition winning design for the self-sufficient scientific research base is now operational on a floating ice shelf 900 miles from South Pole. Hydraulically elevated ski based modules respond to annually rising snow levels and the need to relocate the base if the site calves off as an iceberg. A special central module provides a dramatic open plan social area at the heart of the station. The project demonstrates our ability to create world-class sustainable design to awesome technical criteria.

Halley is the most southerly research station operated by the British Antarctic Survey and is located 10,000 miles from the UK on the 150-metre thick floating Brunt Ice Shelf, which moves 400 metres per annum towards the sea. Snow levels rise by over 1 metre every year and the sun does not rise above the horizon for 105 days during winter. Temperatures drop to -56C and the site can be buffeted by winds in excess of 100 mph. Access by ship and plane is limited to a 3-months window. Materials and components required to construct the new base have to be delivered across fragile sea ice, which can fracture at any time.

International design competition
Whilst the current base, Halley V, continues to operate effectively, a significant calving of the ice shelf is predicted within the next decade, which would see it floating out to sea as a giant iceberg. As a result, in 2004, a 3-stages international competition was launched for the design of a new, fully relocatable base for 16 people in the winter and 52 in the summer. The competition attracted 86 entries from around the world. In July 2005 Hugh Broughton Architects, working with AECOM, were selected as winners.

Concept = modular
The design has been developed in response to the demands of the science, the comfort of the residents, buildability and the operations inherent in the life of a research station. To meet these demands it is crucial to create a design, which maximises flexibility. This is achieved with a modular approach. Modules can be used for a wide variety of activities ranging from laboratories and bedrooms to recreation areas and energy centres. Connected together, the modules form the new station. Modularity brings significant benefits in terms of flexibility, ease of construction, maintenance, relocation, fire safety, acoustics and robustness. The station is centred on two modular platforms. The northern platform provides the principal habitat. The southern platform contains science modules.

Central module = heart of Halley VI
Whilst the majority of activities that take place at Halley can be provided for using the standard blue module, there are some activities, which are constant, and require a distinct approach. These activities are housed in a special red central module. This is the principal space for eating, drinking and recreation and is the major destination at the new base.

Sustainability at the core
Halley VI is the most environmentally friendly facility that BAS has built. Low on environmental impact during construction, with an extremely efficient, environmentally aware performance life cycle, it can be easily moved and eventually taken apart when the time comes. Halley VI will be a visitor to Antarctica, not a resident. The buildings rest entirely on the surface of the ice shelf. This mobility and flexibility means that the new station will survive and perform on the ice for far longer than any of its distinguished predecessors. The design provides flexibility for the station to be adapted, rearranged and relocated.

Designed for self-preservation
To avoid the fate of previous abandoned stations, the modules are supported on giant steel skis and hydraulically driven legs. The hydraulic legs allow the station to mechanically “climb” up out of the snow every year to avoid being buried. And as the ice shelf moves out towards the ocean, the modules can be lowered onto the skis and towed by bulldozers to a new safer location further inland. The new Halley VI can therefore continue to respond to the changing needs of Antarctic science for many more years than its projected design life.

An icon to world class science
Linked together, the ski based jackable modules create a dramatic new station, which propels Antarctic design into the 21st Century. 100 years after Scott and Shackleton built their timber huts on this frozen continent, Halley VI provides the first ever relocatable modular research station, introducing the very best accommodation for both living and working. The station is packed with stimulating areas for recreation, relaxation and allows total flexibility for growth and change. It sets a new benchmark in design for extreme environments, it is a beacon for sustainable living and an icon to draw attention to some of the most significant and influential science conducted on our planet today.

“The new Halley Research Station is a triumph of British design, innovation and engineering. The UK’s world-class polar science community now has a unique, cutting edge suite of laboratories on the ice. The legacy of Captain Scott, together with our strong track record of scientific discovery in Antarctica, is set to continue in this excellent new facility.”
David Willetts,
Minister for Universities and Science

Location
Brunt Ice Shelf, Antarctica

Dates
2005 – 2012

Project team
Hugh Broughton Architects
AECOM (multi disciplinary engineers)
Billings Design (cladding specialist)
Galliford Try (main contractor)
7-t (CGI visuals)

Awards
Chicago Athenaeum International Architecture Award 2014
International Design Awards First Prize: Institutional 2014
ICE 'Designed in London' Award 2014
Architizer Art and Science Award 2014
Architizer Award 2014 (Higher Education / Research)
ENR Best Global Project 2014
ENR Best Global Education / Research Project 2014
Civic Trust Awards Special Award for Sustainability 2014
Civic Trust Award 2014
Structural Awards Award for Sustainability 2013
BCI Awards International Project of the Year 2013
RIBA International Award for Architecture 2013
AIA UK Excellence in Design Winner - Best Scientific Building

Main gallery image: ©JamesMorris_Bedroom-08380ACA.jpg Gallery thumbnail: ©JamesMorris_Bedroom-08380ACA.jpg

HALLEY VI ANTARCTIC RESEARCH STATION

Our international competition winning design for the self-sufficient scientific research base is now operational on a floating ice shelf 900 miles from South Pole. Hydraulically elevated ski based modules respond to annually rising snow levels and the need to relocate the base if the site calves off as an iceberg. A special central module provides a dramatic open plan social area at the heart of the station. The project demonstrates our ability to create world-class sustainable design to awesome technical criteria.

Halley is the most southerly research station operated by the British Antarctic Survey and is located 10,000 miles from the UK on the 150-metre thick floating Brunt Ice Shelf, which moves 400 metres per annum towards the sea. Snow levels rise by over 1 metre every year and the sun does not rise above the horizon for 105 days during winter. Temperatures drop to -56C and the site can be buffeted by winds in excess of 100 mph. Access by ship and plane is limited to a 3-months window. Materials and components required to construct the new base have to be delivered across fragile sea ice, which can fracture at any time.

International design competition
Whilst the current base, Halley V, continues to operate effectively, a significant calving of the ice shelf is predicted within the next decade, which would see it floating out to sea as a giant iceberg. As a result, in 2004, a 3-stages international competition was launched for the design of a new, fully relocatable base for 16 people in the winter and 52 in the summer. The competition attracted 86 entries from around the world. In July 2005 Hugh Broughton Architects, working with AECOM, were selected as winners.

Concept = modular
The design has been developed in response to the demands of the science, the comfort of the residents, buildability and the operations inherent in the life of a research station. To meet these demands it is crucial to create a design, which maximises flexibility. This is achieved with a modular approach. Modules can be used for a wide variety of activities ranging from laboratories and bedrooms to recreation areas and energy centres. Connected together, the modules form the new station. Modularity brings significant benefits in terms of flexibility, ease of construction, maintenance, relocation, fire safety, acoustics and robustness. The station is centred on two modular platforms. The northern platform provides the principal habitat. The southern platform contains science modules.

Central module = heart of Halley VI
Whilst the majority of activities that take place at Halley can be provided for using the standard blue module, there are some activities, which are constant, and require a distinct approach. These activities are housed in a special red central module. This is the principal space for eating, drinking and recreation and is the major destination at the new base.

Sustainability at the core
Halley VI is the most environmentally friendly facility that BAS has built. Low on environmental impact during construction, with an extremely efficient, environmentally aware performance life cycle, it can be easily moved and eventually taken apart when the time comes. Halley VI will be a visitor to Antarctica, not a resident. The buildings rest entirely on the surface of the ice shelf. This mobility and flexibility means that the new station will survive and perform on the ice for far longer than any of its distinguished predecessors. The design provides flexibility for the station to be adapted, rearranged and relocated.

Designed for self-preservation
To avoid the fate of previous abandoned stations, the modules are supported on giant steel skis and hydraulically driven legs. The hydraulic legs allow the station to mechanically “climb” up out of the snow every year to avoid being buried. And as the ice shelf moves out towards the ocean, the modules can be lowered onto the skis and towed by bulldozers to a new safer location further inland. The new Halley VI can therefore continue to respond to the changing needs of Antarctic science for many more years than its projected design life.

An icon to world class science
Linked together, the ski based jackable modules create a dramatic new station, which propels Antarctic design into the 21st Century. 100 years after Scott and Shackleton built their timber huts on this frozen continent, Halley VI provides the first ever relocatable modular research station, introducing the very best accommodation for both living and working. The station is packed with stimulating areas for recreation, relaxation and allows total flexibility for growth and change. It sets a new benchmark in design for extreme environments, it is a beacon for sustainable living and an icon to draw attention to some of the most significant and influential science conducted on our planet today.

“The new Halley Research Station is a triumph of British design, innovation and engineering. The UK’s world-class polar science community now has a unique, cutting edge suite of laboratories on the ice. The legacy of Captain Scott, together with our strong track record of scientific discovery in Antarctica, is set to continue in this excellent new facility.”
David Willetts,
Minister for Universities and Science

Location
Brunt Ice Shelf, Antarctica

Dates
2005 – 2012

Project team
Hugh Broughton Architects
AECOM (multi disciplinary engineers)
Billings Design (cladding specialist)
Galliford Try (main contractor)
7-t (CGI visuals)

Awards
Chicago Athenaeum International Architecture Award 2014
International Design Awards First Prize: Institutional 2014
ICE 'Designed in London' Award 2014
Architizer Art and Science Award 2014
Architizer Award 2014 (Higher Education / Research)
ENR Best Global Project 2014
ENR Best Global Education / Research Project 2014
Civic Trust Awards Special Award for Sustainability 2014
Civic Trust Award 2014
Structural Awards Award for Sustainability 2013
BCI Awards International Project of the Year 2013
RIBA International Award for Architecture 2013
AIA UK Excellence in Design Winner - Best Scientific Building

Main gallery image: ©JamesMorris_Surgery-23CB1DD0.jpg Gallery thumbnail: ©JamesMorris_Surgery-23CB1DD0.jpg

HALLEY VI ANTARCTIC RESEARCH STATION

Our international competition winning design for the self-sufficient scientific research base is now operational on a floating ice shelf 900 miles from South Pole. Hydraulically elevated ski based modules respond to annually rising snow levels and the need to relocate the base if the site calves off as an iceberg. A special central module provides a dramatic open plan social area at the heart of the station. The project demonstrates our ability to create world-class sustainable design to awesome technical criteria.

Halley is the most southerly research station operated by the British Antarctic Survey and is located 10,000 miles from the UK on the 150-metre thick floating Brunt Ice Shelf, which moves 400 metres per annum towards the sea. Snow levels rise by over 1 metre every year and the sun does not rise above the horizon for 105 days during winter. Temperatures drop to -56C and the site can be buffeted by winds in excess of 100 mph. Access by ship and plane is limited to a 3-months window. Materials and components required to construct the new base have to be delivered across fragile sea ice, which can fracture at any time.

International design competition
Whilst the current base, Halley V, continues to operate effectively, a significant calving of the ice shelf is predicted within the next decade, which would see it floating out to sea as a giant iceberg. As a result, in 2004, a 3-stages international competition was launched for the design of a new, fully relocatable base for 16 people in the winter and 52 in the summer. The competition attracted 86 entries from around the world. In July 2005 Hugh Broughton Architects, working with AECOM, were selected as winners.

Concept = modular
The design has been developed in response to the demands of the science, the comfort of the residents, buildability and the operations inherent in the life of a research station. To meet these demands it is crucial to create a design, which maximises flexibility. This is achieved with a modular approach. Modules can be used for a wide variety of activities ranging from laboratories and bedrooms to recreation areas and energy centres. Connected together, the modules form the new station. Modularity brings significant benefits in terms of flexibility, ease of construction, maintenance, relocation, fire safety, acoustics and robustness. The station is centred on two modular platforms. The northern platform provides the principal habitat. The southern platform contains science modules.

Central module = heart of Halley VI
Whilst the majority of activities that take place at Halley can be provided for using the standard blue module, there are some activities, which are constant, and require a distinct approach. These activities are housed in a special red central module. This is the principal space for eating, drinking and recreation and is the major destination at the new base.

Sustainability at the core
Halley VI is the most environmentally friendly facility that BAS has built. Low on environmental impact during construction, with an extremely efficient, environmentally aware performance life cycle, it can be easily moved and eventually taken apart when the time comes. Halley VI will be a visitor to Antarctica, not a resident. The buildings rest entirely on the surface of the ice shelf. This mobility and flexibility means that the new station will survive and perform on the ice for far longer than any of its distinguished predecessors. The design provides flexibility for the station to be adapted, rearranged and relocated.

Designed for self-preservation
To avoid the fate of previous abandoned stations, the modules are supported on giant steel skis and hydraulically driven legs. The hydraulic legs allow the station to mechanically “climb” up out of the snow every year to avoid being buried. And as the ice shelf moves out towards the ocean, the modules can be lowered onto the skis and towed by bulldozers to a new safer location further inland. The new Halley VI can therefore continue to respond to the changing needs of Antarctic science for many more years than its projected design life.

An icon to world class science
Linked together, the ski based jackable modules create a dramatic new station, which propels Antarctic design into the 21st Century. 100 years after Scott and Shackleton built their timber huts on this frozen continent, Halley VI provides the first ever relocatable modular research station, introducing the very best accommodation for both living and working. The station is packed with stimulating areas for recreation, relaxation and allows total flexibility for growth and change. It sets a new benchmark in design for extreme environments, it is a beacon for sustainable living and an icon to draw attention to some of the most significant and influential science conducted on our planet today.

“The new Halley Research Station is a triumph of British design, innovation and engineering. The UK’s world-class polar science community now has a unique, cutting edge suite of laboratories on the ice. The legacy of Captain Scott, together with our strong track record of scientific discovery in Antarctica, is set to continue in this excellent new facility.”
David Willetts,
Minister for Universities and Science

Location
Brunt Ice Shelf, Antarctica

Dates
2005 – 2012

Project team
Hugh Broughton Architects
AECOM (multi disciplinary engineers)
Billings Design (cladding specialist)
Galliford Try (main contractor)
7-t (CGI visuals)

Awards
Chicago Athenaeum International Architecture Award 2014
International Design Awards First Prize: Institutional 2014
ICE 'Designed in London' Award 2014
Architizer Art and Science Award 2014
Architizer Award 2014 (Higher Education / Research)
ENR Best Global Project 2014
ENR Best Global Education / Research Project 2014
Civic Trust Awards Special Award for Sustainability 2014
Civic Trust Award 2014
Structural Awards Award for Sustainability 2013
BCI Awards International Project of the Year 2013
RIBA International Award for Architecture 2013
AIA UK Excellence in Design Winner - Best Scientific Building

Main gallery image: ©JamesMorris_MeetingRoom-6C659CDB.jpg Gallery thumbnail: ©JamesMorris_MeetingRoom-6C659CDB.jpg